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Navy Surgeon General visits Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River

Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison III, 38th surgeon general of the Navy and chief, U.S. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, holds an admiral’s call May 8 during a site visit to Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River. (U.S. Navy photo by Marcus Henry/released)

Story by Marcus Henry

Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River, Maryland

Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison III, 38th surgeon general of the Navy and chief, U.S. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, visits Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River (NHCPR) May 8, 2018.

Faison, along with Force Master Chief Hosea Smith Jr, met with NHCPR’s leadership and staff and toured the clinic as part of his visit.

This visit was the first by the surgeon general to NHCPR which included lunch with junior Sailors, leadership briefings, and an all-hands call.

“If you don’t remember anything else I say today, I want you to remember these two words: thank you. You are making a difference each and every day,” Faison said. “It is an honor and a privilege to serve with you in the most highly trained, educated and specialized Navy in our nation’s history.”

As evidence, Faison presented the greater than 90 percent survival rate for survivable combat injuries, which is unprecedented in the history of military medicine. He said several studies indicate the quality of care in the military health care system is as good, if not better than some of the highest regarded institutions in the nation.

Not resting on the laurels of past achievements, Faison discussed continuing improvements including changing the model in how health care is provided. These new initiatives are geared to be more convenient, offer a better experience of care and utilize improved technology. He said these are areas identified as very important to millennial service members, a substantial percentage of force.

Faison said hospital corpsmen who have the necessary training preparation and readiness would be essential in a sea-based battle. “Corpsmen will be the most important Navy Medicine asset we have. Training is now geared towards the fight at sea. Graduates will attend a clinical rotation at an MTF and follow-on trauma training to be ready for the next conflict. We will focus on Tactical Combat Casualty Care,” Faison said.

Faison also informed the staff of three expectations he has all staff members. His list included being worthy of the trust placed in your hands, being worthy of the uniform you wear, and being worthy of the privilege of leadership.

Before concluding, Faison recognized two staff members by presenting them with coins for their distinguished service.

NHCPR is committed to achieving maximum force readiness by aiming to be manned, trained, and equipped to provide and maintain safe, high-quality healthcare.

Navy Medicine is a global healthcare network of more than 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea, and on the battlefield.

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